Collecting precious findings

What is this object for? Collecting, transporting and displaying small two-dimensional findings – pieces of paper, fabrics, leaves, tickets, musical scores, precious fragments, memories. It can also be a scenographic support for telling stories, using the findings as clues that accompany the story sequences. In the pictures below you can see the “cut-and-fold” technique and the scheme used to make the structure.

A paper archive to collect and show small precious findings

Two “collectors” can be joined together by gluing the vertical sides, in order to have more findings available and to make the structure more stable. It is also preferable to glue a cardboard (with a central fold) on the two sides (that are the horizontal base), to facilitate closing and opening. The archive flattens out like a book and can be easily transported, despite its big size when opened that makes it very scenic and effecting.

Using this tool or other kinds of collectors, a tiny fragment becomes precious. It can also stimulates the theoretical reconstruction of imaginary objects that Bruno Munari describes in his book “Obvious Code”. What can arise from fragments of remains, following a random investigation method on forms, materials and structures? Not scientific reconstructions, but freely suggested by the fragment itself and scrupulously completed by the imagination, in order to make the entire imagined object visible.


And what about you? What kind of collectors do you prefer? You are welcome to explore and share!

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